Equal Pay Day

Equal Pay Day was nationally recognized on April 2, 2019. It was originated by the National Committee on Pay Equity (NCPE) in 1996 as a public awareness event to illustrate the gap between men's and women's wages (NCPE, 2018). It has been a day acknowledging the pay gap for cis white women, and the nationally recognized day does not take into consideration that women of color are not paid the same (Lockhart, 2018). This page serves to acknowledge the wage gap for intersectional identities. Reference links are too offsite sources. 

 

text based graphic for Asian American Women's equal pay day decorated with broken money

Asian American Women

Equal Pay Day: March 5, 2021

Asian American women’s Equal Pay Day (March 5, 2021) is a day to acknowledge the pay disparity that Asian-American women face. While there are subgroups of Asian American women who experience an increasingly higher wage gap, typically Asian American women are paid an average of 87 cents for every dollar paid to white, non-Hispanic men (Tucker, 2020).

 

This wage disparity directly translates into an annual median loss of $8,401 for Asian American women (NWLC, 2020). Current projections for closing the wage gap for AAPI women is approximately 22 years, in 2041 (AAUW). Despite the fact that AAPI women dominate STEM field, a third of Asian American women earn less than $15 (Feminist Newswire, 2018).


African-American and Black Women

Equal Pay Day: August 22, 2021

Black and African-American women’s Equal Pay Day (August 22, 2021) is a day to acknowledge the pay gap that Black and African American women face. Black women make an average of 63 cents for every dollar paid to white, non-Hispanic men (NWLC, 2020). The current wage gap translates into an annual median loss of $24,110 for Black women, adding to the disparity that Black women currently represent the largest percentage of underpaid jobs (AAUW). At the current rate of change for closing the wage gap (a 4% change since 1998), the gap will not close for Black women until 2369 — in 350 years (AAUW).

 Text based graphic for Black and African American Women's equal pay day decorated with broken money 


Text based graphic for Latina Women's equal pay day decorated with broken money

Latina Women

Equal Pay Day: November 20, 2021

Latina women’s Equal Pay Day (November 20, 2021) is a day to acknowledge the pay gap that Latinx American women face. Regardless of age and schooling, the gap affects all Latina women (National Partnership for Women and Families, 2019). The current pay gap for Latina women is typically 55 cents for every dollar paid to white, non-Hispanic men (NWLC, 2020). This wage gap translates into an annual median loss of $29,098 for Latina women (NWLC). Current rates of change for closing this wage gap estimate an end to the disparity in 2451 — in 432 years (AAUW).


Native American Women

Equal Pay Day: September 23, 2021

Native American women’s Equal Pay Day (September 23, 2021) is a day to acknowledge the pay gap that Native American women face. Native women in the U.S. make an average of 60 cents for every dollar paid to white men (NWLC, 2020). The current wage gap equates to an annual median loss of $24,656 for individual Native women. Additionally, Native women have an even larger wage gap compared to white men when they hold their doctoral degree (Patrick and Tucker, 2017).

text based graphic for Native American Women's equal pay day decorated with broken money


text graphic for People with disabilities and equal pay "under the Fair Labor Standards Act, employers are allowed to pay people with disabilities below the minimum wage — notoriously known as the “subminimum” wage" decorated with broken money to show wage disparity

People with Disabilities

While people with disabilities are likely to make around 63% of what people without disabilities make, the gap becomes even larger when people with disabilities acquire a higher level of education (AIR, 2014). Additionally, under the Fair Labor Standards Act, employers are allowed to pay people with disabilities below the minimum wage — notoriously known as the “subminimum” wage (NWLC, 2020).


Trans Women

Trans women earnings fell by nearly one-third following their gender transitions indicating that in addition to facing workplace discrimination in hiring and firing, trans women experience wage gaps (NWLC, 2020)

text based graphic for income disparity for trans women after social and medical transition


text based graphic with broken money for Queer women and equal pay

Queer Women

Women in same-sex couples typically have a median personal income of $38,000, compared to $47,000 for men in same-sex couples and $48,000 for men in different-sex couples (Williams Institute for Law).